Using Juice Pulp to Make Grain-Free Veggie Burgers


Veggie Pancakes 6

May 23, 2014

By Julie Genser

Even though I know fresh vegetable juices are one of the best ways to deliver absorbable nutrients to my inflamed intestines, I have had such resistance to making them lately.

I seem to lack patience for the cleaning, cutting, juicing, washing and other prep work that goes into producing 16-32 ounces of liquid that I down in less than a minute!

That was, until I saw this recipe by Yasmina Ykelenstam (The Low Histamine Chef).

She makes veggie burgers with the pulp left over from her daily juices. Being a complete foodie and someone who enjoys the creative outlet that cooking provides (we all know how little access to joy and creativity we have when challenged by chronic, disabling illness!), I jumped on that recipe right away.

Basically, you make a fresh veggie juice with any organic vegetables you have on hand. Then take the pulp and add 1-2 pasture raised chicken or duck eggs and your favorite herbs and spices to form vegetable patties that you then saute in your oil of choice.

If you don’t eat eggs, you could probably use ground flax or other seeds as a binder, or you could even try almond or coconut flour.

If you don’t use cooking oil, you can bake them.

What I used to make today’s Super Juice: 5 stalks celery, 1 large cucumber, handful of sunflower sprouts, handful of pea shoots (helps stimulate production of the DAO enzyme which breaks down histamine in your body), 1 broccoli stalk (I added the florets to the pulp later when making the patties), 1 fennel bulb (I used some of the fronds in the patties, as well), 2 small stalks of kale, 3 small purple and 1 large orange carrot, 1 beet, handful of cilantro.

You really can use whatever you like to make your juice.

 

Veggie Pancakes 1

 

I juiced the celery, cucumber, sprouts and shoots first and threw out the pulp because it seemed like they might be too fibrous or juicy for the patties (something to think about before you start juicing – use the ones whose pulp you may want to discard first, to make it easy).

Then I mixed together 1 minced garlic clove, 1″ diced ginger, 1 handful of chopped thyme, 2 chopped scallions, some finely chopped broccoli florets, 1 handful of fennel fronds, and 1 finely chopped jalapeno pepper.

 

Veggie Pancakes 2

 

I combined this in a bowl with some of the pulp from juiced veggies.

 

Veggie Pancakes 3

 

I added in 2 chicken eggs, plus a pinch or two of sea salt and ground pepper. I mixed the eggs first before adding them to the pulp, veggies, herbs and spices (otherwise the yolks and whites would remain separated).

Then I used my hands to form three good-sized vegetable patties.

I cooked them in my new cast iron pan (I am anemic and trying to get more iron in my system – this is one good way to do it!) with some olive oil.

You can use coconut or another type of oil if you prefer.

 

Veggie Pancakes 4

 

I cooked them for about 5 minutes on each side until browned (like I would cook an omelette).

They came out absolutely delicious!

 

Veggie Pancakes 5

 

I topped them with some pesto and tomatillo salsa I had left over from takeout at a local restaurant.

They’re good enough to eat alone, but if you have condiments you love, go for it!!

 

Veggie Pancakes 6

 

These would also be super yummy wrapped in lettuce with avocado, onion and tomato.

Use your imagination to dress these up any way you like.

A simple, great way to start your day!

 

About the Author:

Julie HeadshotJulie Genser is recovering from severe environmental illness, mold illness, Lyme disease, Crohn’s disease, and rheumatoid-like arthritis caused by intestinal disease.

She loves to cook and eat, even with a severely restricted diet.

Through brain retraining, she has regained quality of life after severe chemical and electromagnetic sensitivity.

Her focus now is on healing her gut and putting her severe arthritis into remission using food, herbs and non-toxic lifestyle practices.

Her websites include Planet Thrive, Limbic Retraining and Buhner Healing Lyme.

 

Editor’s Note:

Julie Genser (founder of one of my favorite websites, Planet Thrive) has long been an inspiration to me in the kitchen with recipes that are super-clean, nourishing, tasty, beautiful and healing. And now she has found an amazing way to help me use up my veggie juice pulp!

I made these within the hour after first seeing Julie’s pictures (adding a generous amount of sunflower seeds and local New Mexican pecan pieces to the mixture), and they were extremely tasty and satisfying. They also were super-easy and quick to make, and I would bet that my good gut bugs really are loving all that high-quality ground vegetable fiber.

So if you’re juicing, I definitely suggest giving them a try. And if you’re not juicing, here’s one more great reason to start!

Best,

Lisa Petrison

 

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